Mammon and Amen

A Lord’s Supper Meditation

Luke 16:1-18

Etymologically the word mammon and amen come from the same root. Mammon is the thing in which you place your trust and security, for many it is money. In the parable in Luke 16 mammon is money, that which we think will secure or future. This is, of course, idolatry. We trust the gift rather than the Giver. We trust the created thing rather than the Creator.

At the Table we find God’s promise to us that He is more trustworthy than mammon. Money, and created things, are fleeting and unstable, but the body and blood of Christ reaffirm God’s everlasting promise that He will never leave you nor forsake you.

Rather than finding hope and security in mammon, our only hope is in the Name of Jesus, the Name in which we pronounce our Amen.

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Towers, Armies, And Salted Sacrifices

A Lord’s Supper Meditation

Luke 14:25-35

Here at the Table we are given grace. Here, God promises to His church that she has all the resources to build a tower, and more than that, to build a holy temple made from living stones to fill the whole world.

Here at this Table God promises that His church, led by her King, is able to overcome the forces arrayed against her. Here at this Table is the offer to the world of peace, or the promise of destruction. The world must decide what to do as we invade.

Here at the Table God promises the strengthening of our faith to make us as living sacrifices, salted with the salt of the covenant, pleasing to Him.

God offers all of this, promises all of this, through the sacrificed body and blood of His Son.

This Table, then, is a means by which God makes us Kings. We are kings and priests to God and as we eat and drink at the Table of the Kingdom, our faith, allegiance, and sacrifice overcome the world, for a people who are ready to die cannot be defeated.

Table Manners

A Lord’s Supper Meditation.

The Lord’s Table is a model of the principles of table fellowship found in Luke 14:1-24.

We come together as guests in a lowly and humble estate. We come contrite and repentant. We throw ourselves down to our knees, and it is God who lifts up conferring upon us glory and honor we do not deserve. (Luke 14:1-11)

Christ is the Host who is continually filling His house with the kinds of guests who can never repay Him for His grace. He gives His body and blood and only asks that you eat and drink. (Luke 14:12-14)

And now we are the servants of the Master, blessed at the Table of the Kingdom of God, going out into the world to compel the strangers to join the celebration. (Luke 14:5-24).

We learn at the Table what it means to graciously give.